Monday, May 6, 2013

Some Helpful Resources

For information regarding the Pennsylvania Adult Autism Waiver: For information on The Client Assistance Program (CAP): For information on Medicare and Medical Assistance: For information regarding Social Security Disability Benefits:

Tuesday, December 4, 2012

I-Pads for Qualified Individuals from Autism Speaks

Autism Speaks, through their family services and community connections department, will be offering six hundred twenty-five I-Pads to families and individuals who qualify.  The official deadline for the application is December 7, 2012.  If you are interested in finding out if you qualify, log on to

Check our Autism Speaks Website and you will see the application process as well as guidelines. 

Tuesday, October 23, 2012

Self-Advocacy: Imperative Skill for Individuals with Autism

The definition of an advocate is “a person who supports an idea or a plan.”  If you are a parent of a child with an Autism Spetrum Disorder, your role as an advocate for your child is one of the most important you will have in making sure your child with ASD receives the services necessary to meet the challenges that he or she will face.   As children grow older, it is imperative for them to develop self-advocacy skills to foster independence.   If you click on the link below, you’ll read about Henry Frost, a teen with Autism and other physical disabilities.  Henry attends a specialized school in Florida.  However, he believes he has the right to go to his neighborhood school.  He protested outside a Tampa building during the Republican National Convention and posted his picture on Facebook.  He is now pursuing legal actions against his district.  You can read the entire story and find out about Henry’s advocacy efforts below.

Wednesday, September 26, 2012

Autism Support Network's 10 Essential Skills to Teach Students with Autism

 Parents will always want the best for their children and for them to be successful and independent.  Parents with a child on the autism spectrum have the same expectations.  However, we realize that it is much more difficult to prepare for their future with regard to employment, education, and independent living skills.  It is important that we continually advocate for our children during each phase of their education.  In particular, we need to be supportive during the transition planning period.  Most IEP transition planning doesn’t occur until our children reach the ages of 14-16.  However, most parents recognize the need to start this process much earlier.   The autism support network has listed 10 essential skills that we should teach our children before they leave high school.  Don't wait for high school!   For example, personal safety and hygiene can be taught at various levels.  Obviously, some of these skills cannot be directly taught until your child is older and more mature.   But the more adaptive skills you can teach during their elementary/middle schools years, the better!   To view the list of skills see the link below.


Tuesday, September 11, 2012

Chantal Sicle-Kira's Back to School:  
How to Prepare Your ASD Teen
It’s that time of year – back to school!  First day jitters are normal for kids.  But once they get back into the routine, most kids are usually fine.  That’s not always the case with children who have an autism spectrum disorder who - even after a couple of weeks of school - still may be having trouble acclimating to new routines.  Many have anxiety and do not tolerate changes in their routine.  Parents play an important role in preparing their child for the upcoming year.  Their involvement in assisting in the transition will influence their child’s attitude, confidence, and performance both academically and socially.  Chantal Sicile-Kira is an author, advocate/speaker, and parent of a teen with autism.  Check out her back to school tips for parents:  Back to School 101:  How Parents of ASD teens can get prepared for the school year.  Scroll down and also read Back to School:  How to Prepare Your ASD Teen.  Hopefully you’ll be able to use one or two of these tips to ensure a positive start to the new school year and decrease in anxiety for the rest of the year.   Best wishes to everyone for a successful transition back to school!

"There's An App for That"

According to the Journal of Vocational Rehabilitation, new case studies have shown that the use of the Apple IPod Touch served to be very helpful as a personal digital assistant for adults with autism in the workplace.  Adults with autism must be given every opportunity to be successful in the workplace, considering that only 15% of adults with an ASD in the US have some form of paid work.  So remember – there’s an app for that!  Share some of your apps that have been helpful and successful and check out the link below from Disability Scoop to find out how the IPod helped these adults with autism.
iPod May Ease Transition For Those With Autism
As more people with autism enter the work world, a new case study suggests that arming them with specially-programmed iPods may go a long way toward achieving independence on the job.